BeArt Product Presets for Lightroom evaluation

                                                     

A request was  received from BeArt-Presets (https://www.BeArt-Presets.com/) to evaluate the product Lightroom presets  for BeArt-Presets.

At present I create more product photographs than landscapes (it is autumn – wet and windy at present in New zealand) so this was an ideal time to work with these presets. Here with I give you my impressions of working with the product presets from Beart.

If you follow the instructions on the website on how to install the presets you should have no problems at all, smooth and easy.

There are quite a lot of presets, I was happy on how many presets there are available. For instance; there are exposure presets ranging from +2 stops to -.2 stops in conveniently placed steps.

You can also visually adjust the effect of exposure settings from 200 ISO to 6400 ISO by adding visually grain. However I am more impressed with the grain effect settings from Alien Skin, but this grain is not bad looking at 6400. So there is plenty of latitude to alter your (visual) exposure levels.

You are able to adjust the shadows with a simple click, and as a bonus you can do this locally with the BeArt brush adjustment too.

For me most of the fun actually came in the  special effects presets, where you can go from red vintage to black and white matte. There is quite a range of different settings to work with your image, improve your details for instance, contrast cross processing dramatic film, garden settings there are quite a few miscellaneous ones that have at first sight not much to do with product photography like fix blue attack! I would have thought the blue would disappear, it actually increases the blues. But after a little play with all these effects I get some really good results to fine tune my product photographs. Especially when you can have a little bit of free artistic interpretation on your product shot some of these presets are fun to work with.

You will find that these presets are quick in assisting you in correcting your exposure levels or your colour temperature, the preset name is “white balance” but that may be the wrong name for me, you can set the colour balance range from 3000 K to 6000 K in 12 steps, very handy if you want the same colour balance over a range of product shots shot at the same time. When I set the “white balance” I select an area that is should be neutral in colour.  Kelvin colour temperatures have nothing to do with white balance.

The terminology of some of the presets still baffles me a little bit, for instance when you select preset “Fix Dramatic Film 2” I get more a “Bleach Monday Morning effect”. Well that is my impression of the effect…..you may find that each photographer will have their own visual interpretation and translation of the named effects. But they are quite close in description and I like the effects they produce.

There are many presets with the prefix of number two in it, sometimes I do not know what it refers to as there are no other numbers to compare it to. For instance there is a presets called Fix Gold Tone 2 but there is no number one or three. Perhaps the developer of these presets will later introduce an update with the numbers one and three? After a bit of work with these presets you can possibly rename some of the presets to give yourself a better idea what you will achieve with that preset.

That’s how I would work with these presets, go through them, most of them are self-explanatory and do exactly what they say and the ones that are a little bit more “adventurous so to say” you can alter their name to suit your taste.

I followed the installation method number two, this way I could create a folder for each of the type of preset, for instance I’ve got now presets for ISO, white balance, exposure, instead of having one folder with all the presets lumped together.

As these presets are only a one click thing for a global adjustment, you may like to locally adjust the image with the local adjustment presets that are included with this set. You can locally adjust the sharpness, the blue colour or green tint, the noise, saturation or shadows, white background et cetera, I have not mentioned all of them. Quite a few choices are available to you which makes this total set of brushes and presets a very good tool for commercial photographers or even those people that just want to sell an item on eBay or their local trading post.

I find that using these presets is simple, quick and efficient after I have used my basic raw adjustments first. A welcome asset!b-0-weblogo

Summarising:

Cons:

installation was somehow a little problematic using method one, for some reason I did something wrong I think-but by using method two I got it right and everything installed the way I liked it.
The naming of some presets are open to different interpretations but that is easily fixed by renaming them.
Some presets have a number added to the presets description which does not make sense. Why give it a number two when there is no one or three?

Pros:

Versatile, eliminates quickly and efficiently common mistakes in lighting set up.
Extensive set of presets, it covers of wide range of possible corrections to achieve a quick correctly balanced look/effect.”

 

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About musictoyoureyez

Philogynist, pixologist, lexophile.
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